What’s New With CONA

CONA October 2013 Newsletter

October Meeting

When: 7 p.m., October 16,2013
Where: Oakstone Academy
900 Club Dr., Westerville, Ohio 43081

Topic: Counterfeit gold
Speaker: Tony Cass

October Presentation

“Counterfeit Gold Coins” – Be very afraid!!! It has been reported that counterfeit gold coins have been seen at almost every major coin show since 1960. You need to have the knowledge available to combat the counterfeiters and not buy a counterfeit coin. You need to learn about what to look for and know how to differentiate genuine specimens from counterfeits. — Tony Cass

OHIO STATE COIN SHOW

Evan Brill reports the show was a success, with 85 dealers setting up shop, the most he can remember in the 14 years we’ve had a show. Dealers seemed to be pleased with the show.

Tony Cass, who handled exhibits, said the In God We Trust exhibit won the most educational award and the 12 Caesars exhibit won both the most likeable and most likely to encourage involvement in numismatics awards.

September Presentation

Spanish colonial coins are the grandfathers of U.S. Bust coinage, Coin World columnist and Cincinnati coin dealer Bradley Karoleff said in an entertaining presentation titled Where the Hell did we get all that Silver to Mint Bust Coins?

To get the metal used to mint Bust coins, the U.S. Mint melted Spanish colonial coins struck from silver mined in Mexico and South America. There were no silver mines in the eastern U.S., Karoleff said. “The only way we were getting silver was to get it from somewhere else.”

Spanish conquerers mined silver across the continent, enslaving Aztec and Inca to wrest the metal from the ground.

Cerro Rico mountain at Potosi, Bolivia, was extensively mined. “They’re afraid this thing’s going to collapse,” Karoleff said pointing to a picture of the mountain’s baren hillside. “They’ve got so many shafts down there.”

In the early 1800s banks, especially the Bank of the United States, took Spanish colonial coins, including the eight reales – the first coin in the Red Book – to the Philadelphia Mint to be melted and recoined into U.S. coins.

“The next time you pick up a Bust coin, you may hear the cry of the Aztec or the Inca,” Karoleff said.

By: Gerry Tebben

CONA September 2013 Newsletter

September Meeting

When: 7 p.m., September 18,2013
Where: Oakstone Academy
900 Club Dr., Westerville, Ohio 43081

Topic: Where the Hell did we get all that Silver to Mint Bust Coins?
Speaker: Brad Karoleff

OHIO STATE COIN SHOW

The coin show, as usual, was an outstanding success. Bourse Chairman Evan Brill lined up a first-class group of coin dealers. Tony Cass shepherded what was probably our best group of educational displays yet. Steve Petty gave a presentation on silver dollars as part of a regional meeting of the Liberty Seated Collectors Society. Retired Coin World Editor Beth Deisher gave a presentation in support of her new book, Cash for your Coins. President Charles Caldwell says, “Thanks to all of the Green Hats for their help at the show. Without all of you members, the show would not be a success.”

September Presentation

Coin World columnist and Cincinnati coin dealer Bradley Karoleff is our September speaker. The title of his talk is: Where the Hell did we get all that Silver to Mint Bust Coins?

Karoleff knows a bit about the subject. He’s the editor of the John Reich Journal, the official publication of the John Reich Collectors Society. We’re lucky that he is willing to share his knowledge with us.

In August he was named the 2013 ANA Harry J. Forman Dealer of the Year Award. The award is presented annually to an ANA-member dealer who shows uncommon dedication to strengthening the hobby and the ANA. The award is named in honor of the late Harry J. Forman, a Philadelphia coin dealer, author and ANA life member.

Here’s the ANA press released:

Bradley S. Karoleff is the 2013 recipient of the American Numismatic Association Harry J. Forman Dealer of the Year Award, presented Aug. 13 at the World’s Fair of Money Kickoff event.

The award is presented annually to an ANA-member dealer who shows uncommon dedication to strengthening the hobby and the Association. The award is named in honor of the late Harry J. Forman, a Philadelphia coin dealer, author and ANA life member.

Karoleff, who started as a dealer at the age of 16, is a partner in Coins Plus, a Cincinnati-area business that was first established in 1972.

“My dad always told me if you kept your nose to the grindstone and worked hard that in the end you’d be rewarded, and this is it,” Karoleff said. “Everyday I go to play; I never have to go to work.”

An ANA Life Member, Karoleff also holds memberships in the Professional Numismatists Guild, The John Reich Collectors Society, The Ohio State Numismatic Society and The Cincinnati Numismatic Association.

A prolific writer, Karoleff is a contributor to several publications, including:A Guide Book of United States Coins,Handbook of United States Coins,Early Quarter Dollars of the United States Mint 1796-1838,Coin World and The Numismatist.

He is also the longtime editor of the John Reich Journal, which is the official publication of the John Reich Collectors Society.

Karoleff received the honor from ANA President Tom Hallenbeck and Executive Director Kim Kiick at Beyond the Ivy, a rooftop baseball venue located across from Chicago’s historic Wrigley Field.

By: Gerry Tebben

CONA August 2013 Newsletter

August Meeting

When: 7 p.m., August 21,2013
Where: Oakstone Academy
900 Club Dr., Westerville, Ohio 43081

Topic: Preparation for Ohio State Coin Show

Membership Record

CONA has a record 186 members as of July 17, 2013. We are one of the larger clubs in the country.

By: Gerry Tebben

CONA July 2013 Newsletter

May Meeting

When: 7 p.m., July 17,2013
Where: Oakstone Academy
900 Club Dr., Westerville, Ohio 43081

Topic: Seleukid Era
Speaker: Dan and Miles

July Presentation

Miles and I will talk about Ohio tokens and medals. The focus will be on the many types of tokens and medals available and the many themes that a collector can tailor his collection towards. We’ll talk about our own collections and interests. There will be lots of tokens to look at to maybe spark some new collecting interests! – Dan

June Presentation Recap

John gave Part I of a presentation on Seleukid coinage. John will present Part II next summer. One of the neat things about John’s talk was how a knowledgeable collector can find rare coins on eBay.

By: Gerry Tebben

CONA June 2013 Newsletter

May Meeting

When: 7 p.m., June 19,2013
Where: Oakstone Academy
900 Club Dr., Westerville, Ohio 43081

Topic: Seleukid Era
Speaker: John

June Presentation

The beginning of the Seleukid era is dated from July 1, 312 BC, when Seleukos I Nikator (the Victorious) returned to Babylon in triumph after literally having had to flee the city in the middle of the night due to an invasion by the powerful Antigonos Monophthamos (The One-eyed), a former general of Alexander the Great and his son Demetrios I Poliorketes (Besieger of Cities) in 316 BC. – John

April Presentation Recap

Bruce gave a fabulous presentation on Connecticut Coppers that included this tidbit. Abel Buell, one of the issue’s die makers, was once convicted of counterfeiting. “His punishment consisted of imprisonment, cropping and branding. The tip of his ear was cut off, held on the tongue, and replaced, where it grew on. He was branded on the forehead, so high up that the hair afterward covered the scar. But the hot iron was held on long enough to say, ‘God Save the King.’”

View this presentation and several others in our Library.

By: Gerry Tebben

CONA May 2013 Newsletter

May Meeting

When: 7 p.m., May 15,2013
Where: Oakstone Academy
900 Club Dr., Westerville, Ohio 43081

Topic: Connecticut Coppers
Speaker: Bruce

May Presentation

Connecticut Coppers, along with the state coinages of Massachusetts and New Jersey (and the Republic of Vermont), were authorized under the Articles of Con- federation. Minted from 1785 until 1789, they were designed to fill a need for small change in daily trans- actions. These coins comprise a fascinating series of over 350 varieties that may be collected in numerous ways. Counterfeits, painted die varieties, overstrikes, and nicknames such as “Muttonhead” and “Snipe Nose” are all part of the story. – Bruce

April Presentation Recap

Russ talked about error coins and displayed several rarities. “I do have a 1943 copper cent,” he said. “But unfortunately, it’s Canadian.” He cautioned begining collectors to beware of fakes. “A lot of stuff is made in the basement,” he said.
As part of his presentation, he gave everyone a printout showing how coins are made. A blank plan- chet was attached to the handout, giving everyone a first-hand look at the intial step in coinage – upsetting the edge.

Dallas Meeting

Herman Blanton of the Mount Vernon Numismatic Society and editor of the Numismatics International Bulletin, says Numismatics International will hold a three-day seminar June 7-9 at Irving, Texas, on foreign coins, counterfeits and grading. For more information and a registration form go to numis.org.

By: Gerry Tebben

CONA April 2013 Newsletter

April Meeting

When: 7 p.m., April 17,2013
Where: Oakstone Academy
900 Club Dr., Westerville, Ohio 43081

Topic: Error Coins
Speaker: Russ

April Presentation

My talk on error coins will focus on the production of coins at the U S Mint and address each step of production and the errors that may be produced during that step. Understanding how coins are made will help the collector understand what can or can not occur during the process. I will explain the PDS (Planchet, Die, & Striking) system of classifying errors and discuss rarity and value of the errors. There will be handouts to help explain the process as well as examples of the error coins produced and even a blank planchet for those in attendance! – Russ

March Presentation Recap

John Roberts reprised his talk on coins, medals and paper money depicting coining presses.

Early American Coppers

EAC, the club for collectors of Colonial coins, large cents and half cents, is holding its annual convention, at Cherry Valley Lodge in Newark, Ohio, May 3, 4 and 5. The club is looking for volunteers to help with registration and keeping an eye on the coins during auction-lot viewing. See Charles if you’re interested.

Dallas Meeting

Herman Blanton of the Mount Vernon Numismatic Society and editor of the Numismatics International Bulletin, says Numismatics International will hold a three-day seminar June 7-9 at Irving, Texas, on foreign coins, counterfeits and grading. For more information and a registration form go to numis.org.

CONA seminar – BIG success

First impressions critical, grading experts say

Professional graders typically spend less than 30 seconds on a coin and rarely use a magnifying glass, a panel of experts told about 30 Central Ohio Numismatic Association members during a grading seminar April 6.

Grading is more of an art than a science, the panel told participants in the two two-hour sessions that were funded in part with a speakers grant from Central States Numismatic Society.

CONA Vice President Steve Petty, who helped arrange the seminar, introduced the panel. “We
are fortunate to have three folks who really know their stuff,” he said. Steve Roach, editor of Coin World and a former ANACS grader, was assisted by CONA members Tony Cass, a former ANACS grader, and John Roberts, VAM expert and ANACS director of attribution services.

Roach said professional graders use a magnifying glass only to do such things as check a coin’s authenticity or determine variety, “not for grading.” Roberts said, “Most grading is done naked eye.” He noted most coins are checked by three graders, with the final grade being a consensus grade.

Grading is based primarily on the totality of the coin, with the first impression being key. Roberts
said, “It’s the overall impression of an entire coin.” Roach said using a magnifying glass focuses the grader’s attention on a small area and stops him from looking at the whole coin.

The first thing to do when grading a coin, Roach said, is determine whether it is circulated or uncirculated. “It’s not always a clean line,” he said. Check a coin’s high points for signs of wear. Grading guides, such as Coin World’s Making the Grade show where coins are likely to wear first.

However, even experts can disagree on whether a coin is a high-end circulated coin or an uncirculated one. Roach said two 1804 silver dollars now in Proof 62 holders were once graded About Uncirculated.

He said the difference between AU58 and MS62 is “a slippery sliding scale that people make a lot of money on.” Roberts said, “Most 58s look like a 63.” Roach noted, “The market almost always rewards a pretty 58 over an ugly 61.”

Robert said the best way to learn the difference between circulated and uncirculated coins is, to “look at as many coins as you can.”

The amount of wear is the chief determinant of grade for circulated coins. “For uncirculated coins,” Roach said, “you’re looking at a whole different standard.” Strength of strike, color, and the number and placement of bag marks all come into play.

The question becomes, Roach said, “How pretty is the coin.”

He said, “A coin lives and dies based on the strength of the obverse.” A good reverse never helps, but a bad one always hurts. He said a coin with an MS62 obverse and an MS65 reverse will grade MS 62.

Before the seminar, Cass covered over the grades on 16 slabbed coins, ranging from a holed 1793 Chain cent to an MS66 1886-S Morgan dollar, and set them out for seminar participants to grade.

Participants looked at each coin for two minutes before a quack from Roach’s phone alerted them to pass it along to the next person.

The Chain sent, a plugged AG details piece, drew considerable interest. Roach said, “This is the kind of coin you should never buy raw.” Counterfeiters batter fake Chain cents to make them appear more realistic, he said.

A 1936 Long Island commemorative half dollar in MS 64 proved difficult for some to grade, too. Classic commems come in a variety of finishes and reliefs. Some were packaged in high-sulfur holders. Cass advised collectors to seek out every book they can find on the series to learn more about the coins. “It (grading classic commemoratives) is a nightmare in terms of knowing every coin,” he said.

Roach noted that gunk on a circulated coin often turns to corrosion and spots can grow over time. It’s not always about what the coin looks like today, Roberts said, but what it might turn into tomorrow.

By: Gerry Tebben

CONA March 2013 Newsletter

March Meeting

When: 7 p.m., March 20,2013
Where: Oakstone Academy
900 Club Dr., Westerville, Ohio43081

Topic: Allegorical Representations of Coining
Speaker: John Roberts

In Memoriam

Jeffrey Charles Cranston — 1958 -2013
Jeffrey Charles Cranston, 54, passed away suddenly at home February 16, 2013. Born May 10, 1958 in Portsmouth, OH.

Retired in 2010 from 32 years at OPERS. Preceded in death by brother Jack, father Charles, and grandparents Cranston and Anderson. Survived by mother, Lucille Cranston, loving wife, Lisa Adams Cranston; and dog, Wallace Cranston; sister, Jenny Jones; nephew, Kollin; and niece, Bailey; mother-in- law, Laura Adams; sister-in-law, Kate Storm (Gary Saum). Will be greatly missed by special friends, Karen, Mitch, Margie, Cathy, Mikey B., Eric, Snook and Billy C. Treasurer and member of CONA, mem- ber of SABR, lifelong fan of the Reds and Cleveland Browns, and Civil War historian.

CONA donated $100 to the Gettysburg Foundation in Jeff’s memory.

March Presentation

John Roberts will reprise his talk on coins, medals and paper money depicting coining presses.

February Presentation Recap

More than 140 years after it was minted, Steve Petty discovered a previously unreported variety of the 1870 CC Seated dollar.

So far no other examples of die marriage 3B have turned up.

Steve started on his quest when he noticed unusual raised lines on the obverse of the coin. He compared it with nearly 100 coins photographed in online auction catalogs and determined that his was the first coin of this variety. 

Grading Seminar

Coin World Editor Steve Roach will conduct two grading seminar sessions probably at our regular meeting place on Saturday, April 6.

The first session will be from 10 a.m. to noon; the second from 1 to 3 p.m. Attendance is limited to 15 each session. Advance registration is required. To register, sign up at the next club meeting. Registration is $15.

Central States Numismatic Society’s speakers grant program will provide $200 of the estimated $680 to $855 cost of putting on the seminars. The balance will come from registration fees ($300 to $450) and the club’s treasury ($180 to $205).

Early American Coppers

EAC, the club for collectors of Colonial coins, large cents and half cents, is holding its annual convention, at Cherry Valley Lodge in Newark, Ohio, May 3, 4 and 5. The club is looking for volunteers to help with registration and keeping an eye on the coins during auction-lot viewing. See Charles if you’re interested.

New Shop

Bill’s Coins, Collectables and More!

Hocking Hills Flea Market in Rockbridge, OH south of Lancaster.

By: Gerry Tebben

CONA February 2013 Newsletter

February Meeting

When: 7 p.m., January 20,2013
Where: Oakstone Academy
900 Club Dr., Westerville, Ohio 43081

Topic: 1870-CC Seated Dollar
Speaker: Steve Petty

February Presentation

Stephen will present an overview of the article on the 1870-CC Seated Dollar just published in the Gobrecht Journal. This paper focused on research to determine the varieties for this specific date to determine if an odd dollar he purchased was a new or existing variety. His work developed a new attribution method for this seated dollar and established statistics on the rarity of various marriages. Steve will discuss how this SD was acquired, how the research was conducted and findings from the research. PS: This odd dollar – was found to be a new and rare marriage.

January Presentation Recap

“It took me 15 years to find this thing,” Charles Caldwell said as he displayed a medal awarded to his great grandfather’s brother by the state of Ohio for service during the Civil War. The medal, engraved with the name of William F. Wiley, still had its original ribbon and came with a rare 1866 form awarding it to him.
Charles became interested in the Civil War as a child after he was given the fork and spoon from his ancestor’s military mess kit. Today he specializes in his great grand uncle’s unit, Co. I of the Ohio 25th.
The bronze Tiffany medal was awarded to Ohio soldiers who re-enlisted after their intial term was up. Wiley’s re-enlistment paper attests, among other things, that he was “entirely sober when he re-enlisted.”
Wiley was wounded twice; shot in the leg at Gettysburg and the arm at Honey Hill, S.C. He died in 1890.

Grading Seminar

Steve Petty reported the club is working on a grading seminar for the spring. While detals are still being worked out, current thought is Coin World Editor Steve Roach will conduct two two-hour seminars for 15 people each on Saturday, April 6 at Oakstone. Registration will be required. Steve Petty will have details for discussion at our February meeting. “One of the most important things you can do,” he said, “is learn how to grade.”

By: Gerry Tebben

CONA 2013 January Newsletter

January Meeting

When: 7 p.m., January 16
Where: Oakstone Academy
900 Club Dr., Westerville, Ohio 43081
Topic: Civil War
Speaker: Charles Caldwell

January Presentation

Charles Caldwell combines numismatics, history and genealogy in a talk about his hunt for a medal awarded to his ancestor during the Civil War. He illustrates the presentation with artifacts, including an ancient piece of hardtack, and describes the decade-long search that ended with his purchase.

Dues are Due

This is a reminder to everyone that dues are due: $15 for a single and $21 for a family.

By: Gerry Tebben
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